Simple Sourdough Boule

We had a fantastic weekend. Our friend, Othello, was in town from Los Angeles, and he was nice enough to snap a few photos of Kramer and I. We never had engagements photos done or anything like that, so it was a lot of fun to see how wonderfully these turned out, even if we felt kind of awkward posing at first. I am honestly just in love with how all of these turned out, and he was really able to tell a story through the photos. We started off at the end of the new section of the Highline, where the light was just beautiful and we got over the fact that people kept staring at us as they walked by. These definitely more than make up for the lack of couple photos that we have from the time we were engaged, and honestly, I think that they are better than most of our wedding photos. Obviously, Othello also has some crazy lenses, so he was able to grab some larger than life looking shots, which I also adore. So thank you again, Othello! You’re the man (as always).

You know who is also the man? Kramer, for making this sourdough boule. When Kramer gets into a bread baking mood, it’s only good news for me, because he stands in the kitchen, slaving over a big ball of dough, while I get to lounge on the couch, watching television and drinking beers. Isn’t that the life that all women want for their daughters? I know my mom couldn’t be happier, right mom? Either way, Kramer is a master bread maker, and this boule only proves that point. It’s perfectly crusty on the outside, with a crust that actually crackles as you cut into it, and the inside is chewy and full of delicate holes – there’s nothing better when it comes to sourdough. The bread itself has just the right amount of sourdough-y bite to it, and I don’t think there’a anything better than slathering a big slice of this in some nice butter or using it to make the most delicious sandwich imaginable. So thank you, Kramer, for continuing to take the initiative and bake some beautiful boules, and please know that I will always be there for you, watching TV and waiting, whenever you want to bake some more.


Simple Sourdough Boule
Your dry ingredients, there are only 3!

Simple Sourdough Boule
A sourdough culture/starter is absolutetly essential to this recipe. The flavor developed in a sourdough starter is cultivated over time as it slowly ferments in your fridge. The starter should have a crisp sour aroma, slightly alcoholic smelling. We start our recipe by feeding our sourdough culture a 50:50:100 ratio, by weight, of sourdough starter:water:bread flour. This creates a 50% hydration starter, or a “stiff stater.” This will be sticky and a little hard to work with. We let this ferment in the fridge overnight.

Simple Sourdough Boule Simple Sourdough Boule
Simple Sourdough Boule Simple Sourdough Boule
Simple Sourdough Boule Simple Sourdough Boule

Thoroughly combine your dry ingredients and mix your 110 degree water and the starter with your hands, slowly add in the dry ingredients. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Do exactly one “stretch and fold” kneads and form the dough into a ball by tucking in the bottom. Place into a floured bowl, cover and let rise for an hour, make sure the room tempature is above 75 degrees. Repeat the “stretch and fold” knead after and hour and then let rise for another hour. After the second rise stretch and fold it for a third time.

Simple Sourdough Boule
The dough’s texture will be much easier to work with after the third fold.

Simple Sourdough Boule
Place the dough in a heavily floured banneton (I prefer semolina for this)

Simple Sourdough Boule
Make sure the seams, or the bottom of the round that you have been tucking under itself, are facing up. Pace in an airtight bag and let rise overnight in the fridge.

Simple Sourdough Boule
Turn out the dough onto your floured feel by flipping the banneton upside down. Let rise in a warm space for 2 hours.

Simple Sourdough Boule
Lightly score your bread with the sharpest knife you have in the house, for me that was a fresh exacto knife. This allows for maximum oven spring, letting the dough expand uninhibited in the baking process.

Preheat your oven at 450 degrees. Place your stone on a middle rack and a cast iron pan on the bottom of the stove, both of these surfaces will require sufficient time to preheat, give them at least 20 minutes. The pizza stone will create a crispy crust on the bottom of the boule and the cast iron will generate steam to give your crumb oven spring and help to caramelize the crust.
Simple Sourdough Boule
Slide the boule onto the stone and dump 1/3 cup of hot water onto the cast iron pan. Immediately shut the door to preserve as much steam as possible.

Simple Sourdough Boule
After 3 minutes open the oven to place your boule under a metal mixing bowl. Make sure you get a bowl that has enough space for the boule to expand, especially in height. The steam will be dissipated, but no need to worry, the bowl will continue to promote the correct environmental settings for your boule.

After 15 minutes remove the bowl from the oven and let the boule bake uncovered for another 20 minutes. Pull out when crust has reached desired level of browning.

Simple Sourdough Boule
Let cool on a wire rack for at least 20 minutes before slicing.

Simple Sourdough BouleThe semolinia flour dusting can be easily brushed off, or left on for a rustic effect.

Simple Sourdough BouleSimple Sourdough BouleSimple Sourdough BouleThis post was submitted to Yeastspotting.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Simple Sourdough Boule
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1 loaf
 
A simple recipe for the most chewy, crusty sourdough bread.
Ingredients
  • 300g King Arthur's high gluten flour
  • 205g of 110 degree F filtered water
  • 50g of "firm" (50% hydration) Sourdough Starter
  • 6g kosher salt
Instructions
  1. Thoroughly combine your dry ingredients and mix your 110 degree F water and the starter gently by hands, slowly add in the dry ingredients.
  2. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Do exactly one "stretch and fold" kneads and form the dough into a ball by tucking in the bottom.
  3. Place into a floured bowl, cover and let rise for an hour, make sure the room temperature is above 75 degrees F. Repeat the "stretch and fold" knead after and hour and then let rise for another hour.
  4. After the second rise stretch and fold it for a third time. Place the dough in a heavily floured banneton making sure that the seams of the boule are facing up. Pace in an airtight bag and let rise overnight in the fridge.
  5. Turn out the dough onto your floured feel by flipping the banneton upside down. Let rise in a warm space for 2 hours.
  6. Lightly score your bread with the sharpest knife you have in the house, for me that was a fresh exacto knife. Meanwhile preheat your oven, baking stone and cast iron pan to 450 degrees.
  7. Slide the boule onto the stone and dump ⅓ cup of hot water onto the cast iron pan. Immediately shut the door to preserve as much steam as possible.
  8. After 3 minutes open the oven to place your boule under a large oven safe bowl. After 15 minutes remove the bowl from the oven and let the boule bake uncovered for another 20 minutes. Pull out when crust has reached desired level of browning.
  9. Let cool on a wire rack for at least 20 minutes before slicing.

 

49 Responses

  1. Lindsey says:

    the most perfect loaf ever! I think Kramer should become a professional bread baker in Williamsburg, the world would be a better place.

  2. That sourdough looks absolutely perfect!

  3. Mom says:

    Magnifique! The basket totally makes the bread, besides a master machine a` pain!
    I know you always wanted my job Sydney.

  4. Wowzers. Kramer I am in awe of your bread baking skills – I aspire to do this kind of baking myself some day! I successfully attempted a tomato basil bread yesterday, but sour dough is a whole other story. Still, I purchased that KA sourdough starter and with posts like this I hope to get more confident in bread baking. Thanks for the step by step tutorial!

  5. Carol Egbert says:

    What a talented friend you have.

  6. Carol Egbert says:

    Such a gorgeous loaf of bread I posted it on Pinterest.
    Here’s a link http://pinterest.com/pin/461898247/

  7. sara says:

    Ooooh, I haven’t made sourdough bread in way too long! This looks so delicious! :)

  8. Hannah says:

    Those photos are so dang pretty! Nice work.

  9. Benita says:

    About 1/2 hour before reading this post I started my own sourdough starter–kismet!

  10. Kimberly says:

    That bread is gorgeous!

  11. Dana says:

    That is a gorgeous gorgeous loaf of bread.

  12. Jane M says:

    Nice photos – nice bread! It sure was a gorgeous Fall weekend.

  13. first time on your blog and I already enjoy it here. The sourdougg boule looks so perfect, I love the pictures by the way!

  14. SallyBR says:

    Gorgeous loaf! you did a superb job on the slashing, I am impressed!

    to me, it’s the trickiest part of making the boule, I just never know if it will look great or… blah ;-)

  15. Claire says:

    I am so jealous of your beautiful hair in your engagement photos! I would like nothing more than to be eating hot soup out of this sourgough boule. Looks sooo good.

  16. So beautiful; both the photos and the boule. Both a cause for major celebration

  17. Gorgeous loaf! I really need to try a sourdough loaf.

  18. Nothing makes my mouth water like an absolutely gorgeous loaf of bread such as this one. I make a lot of bread, but haven’t ventured into the sourdough world yet. I may have to start soon!

  19. […] Sourdough Boule (The Crepes of Wrath) […]

  20. frosty says:

    Hey where do we get your sourdough starter?

  21. Damn, that is one fine lookin’ loaf of bread! I am still kind of wary of yeast (I’ve had many a failed starter), but this boule business sounds just too good to pass up. But the biggest question: How does one pick the perfect sandwich filling for such amazing bread?!

    I am absolutely LOVING Othello’s photos of you two! The giggly awkardness is perfectly captured, seriously. You guys are absolutely adorable.

    • Sydney says:

      Aw, thank you so much! Believe me, Kramer sliced off two big sandwich sized slices and reserved them for his lunch the next day just so we wouldn’t keep eating it on its own.

  22. […] Flour Company. Of course, a day or two later Crepes of Wrath posted a stellar blog about making a simple sourdough boule. They have such great recipes (and timing!). So this past weekend I gave it another chance and […]

  23. […] to keep going. I recently purchased some King Arthur Sourdough Starter after reading a number of delicious sourdough recipes on Crepes of Wrath that inspired me. I made my first test loaf over the weekend, and am looking […]

  24. First time to your blog! I am so glad that I stumbled upon it! This bread recipe looks fabulous! Can’t wait to try it.

  25. […] proofed, according to the original recipe I used, meant an overnight rest in the fridge in a plastic bag. A full 12 hours later, my seeded […]

  26. David Musgrove says:

    After learning that my Fathers Fav Bread was Sour Dough I set out to learn how to make this for him, I had never baked a loaf of bread in my Life. I learn from different websites on making my starter which is now over 5 yrs old. I feel as though I have accomplished what I set out to do as making my Father the best Sour Dough he will get on the east coast, However, I wish from the beginning I had your website as a training site….Your Bread is BEAUTIFUL !!!!

  27. […] at making bread, that I’ll be honest, I was a bit intimidated. He’s made danishes and sourdough boules and pizza…I just figured I’d leave the bread to him and I’d stick with cooking […]

  28. Spencer says:

    I made this last week with my Carl’s Oregon Trail sourdough starter I sent away for (it’s free!). One of the best loaves I’ve made, and am making two more today. Thanks for this great recipe and lovely photos. I appreciate the details.

  29. […] favorite sourdough bread recipe I sort-of followed when I first started out was this one from Crepes of Wrath. I didn’t follow the recipe very well, but still got a delicious (and beautiful!) loaf. […]

Leave a Reply

©2014 The Crepes of Wrath